Frozen: A Scary & Innovative Horror Flick

Go see this movie.

Watch the trailer for Frozen, and then check out the official site.

I had the pleasure of meeting the writer & director, Adam Green, this past weekend. My friend Robert and he are old buddies from college who just reconnected. Adam invited us to go to a screening in Santa Monica on Saturday after which there was a meet & greet with the cast & crew. After that we went out for drinks and I had a really good time. Ahhh, schmoozing, the second-oldest profession.

So, not only do I like the guy and want to see his movie succeed, but I genuinely thought the movie was a good time and I want to get more people out there to see it!

It’s an independently produced horror movie, which already stacks the odds against it. It is also an original production, not a remake, which further hardens the sell. It seems most horror fans out there cry for new original stories over remakes, but when it comes time to show their support, movies like Frozen get overlooked. This is sad.

I am a huge horror fan, and I am one of those people who is disappointed with the glut of remakes out there. So I am taking some of my time to get the word out there about Frozen because we need more movies like it!

It was an intense flick that had me gripping the edge of my seat for most of the movie. It grabbed me and didn’t let go, had me cringing and going “OHHHHHH” at some of the gory scenes. At a few moments I was so uncomfortable that I had to disengage by looking away or pretending I was in a happy place. To me, that is a sign of a good movie. It affected me. It wasn’t hum-drum, boring, or predictable. It still had a few of those campy, horror movie moments and I think that is where its charm is. If a horror movie can be charming, that is.

The acting was really good, and I think that Adam’s directing style had a lot to do with this. The entire movie was shot “practically” which means “on location”. There was no green-screen, no studio, no tricks. It was all filmed outdoors, on a ski slope, with the actors IN the gondola.

During the meet & greet they said that the actors had to be up on the gondola for six hours at a time. The filming was done on a ski resort in Utah and the lift was so long that to get off they had to ride all the way to the top of the mountain and all the way down, which took over an hour. So they had to limit the amount of interruptions in order to maximize filming time.

All the scenes in which it is snowing outside are real. When you can no longer see the actors’ breath, that’s because they are running out of body heat. That seems brutal to have endured that during filming for the actors, but I don’t feel too bad for them. THIS IS HORROR!

I felt like some of the scenarios were a little over-the-top, but I am ok with it. Isn’t that the point of a good horror film? Personally, I don’t want too much realism. I want fear, death, blood, and other delicious things that would probably never happen in real life. I definitely wouldn’t enjoy seeing people die in real life, I promise.

If you’re in for a good thrill, check your local movie listings and check out Frozen. I mean, come on, being that the majority of the Northeastern U.S. is under feet of snow & ice right now, how appropriate is this film?

VERY.